Browse Linux Filesystem (EXT2/EXT3/EXT4) From Windows

Linux and Windows, both operating systems have fair share of users. Now, there is the other sector of users who use both these operating systems and I’m one of them. I really love the way how Linux browses Windows filesystems effortlessly and it helps me a lot. In the same way, some situations demand us to access Linux partition from Windows. But, Windows is not as open as Linux, so, we have to rely on 3rd party softwares to access Linux partitions from Windows. Ext2explore is a brilliant freeware that does exactly what it says.

Ext2explore lets you access Linux partitions (not just Ext2, but also Ext3 and Ext4) from Windows. Moreover it is portable and no installation is required. Just Run Ext2explore as Administrator and it’ll scan your hard drive and will list Linux partitions that were found.

Browsing My Ubuntu Partition (Ext4) with Ext2explore

Browsing My Ubuntu Partition (Ext4) with Ext2explore

The interface is divided into two, all directories of Linux partition are listed on left and on right the contents of selected folder will be displayed. So, once you find the desired file, right-click on it and select Save. Now, it’ll ask you for destination folder, so, select the destination directory and that file will be copied from Linux partition onto that folder. Not just files, you can even copy folders (and all of its content) from Linux to Windows in the same way.

Copying files from Ubuntu to Windows

Copying file from Ubuntu to Windows

Even though Copy/Paste options are available, they are greyed out and hence you can’t write to Linux partition from Windows. But, that shouldn’t matter as you can do that seamlessly from Linux itself. So, if you are frequently facing situations where Linux partition has to be accessed from Windows, then Ext2explore is for you. Download it from the link below and use it until Windows adds native support for Linux partitions! (That’d be for a lifetime I guess)

Download : Ext2explore

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